Be My Baby (2013) by Hitoshi One

The complicated world of dating and relationships is put under the microscope in this emotional drama. Koji (Kenta Niikura) and his girlfriend Tomoko (Naoko Wakai) have invited a group of friends to their apartment: Koji’s friend Yuta (Takumi Matsuzawa) and Yuta’s room-mate Takashi (Daisuke Sawamura); Koji’s brother Naoki (Yuki Ueda) and his girlfriend Satomi (Aya Kunitake) are the next to arrive, followed by Tomoko’s friends Kaori (Chihiro Shibata) and Yuka (Yumi Goto). The reason for their gathering is to introduce Yuka to Koji’s friend Osamu (Kenta Tsumuraya). Far from being a kind gesture, it underlines Koji’s cruel streak as he wants to set his friend up with someone he sees as unattractive as a joke. This casual get together gives us an insight into the various interpersonal relationships, with joking, sexual tension, gossiping and arguments breaking out. Following the party the film follows each of these individuals as their lives are variously tangled together in sexual and romantic relationships, showing the tribulations of love, lust and life.

From the opening moments the film does an incredible job of bringing you into the lives of these young adults, with believable dialogue and each actor fully embracing their role. Every scene is set in one of the character’s apartments with usually no more than three people involved. This gives everything a very personal and immediate feel. The rooms are cocoon-like spaces, crammed full of clothes, posters of pin-ups, takeaway wrappers, and other indications of each character’s tastes and personality. The set decoration and costumes bring as much to our understanding of the character dynamics as the performances, with some fun story hints if you are paying attention. Hitoshi One’s direction utilises cramped framing, blocking, close-ups and a low camera position to bring us down to the level of the characters. The hand-held camera work furthers this sense of a voyeuristic fly-on-the-wall feel. The film is based on a stage production, which the actors watched before filming, and it makes a comfortable transition to film. Largely dialogue driven, with a script by Daisuke Miura, the actors workshopped their scenes and it shows in the naturalistic style and chemistry between them. The film is structured as a series of conversations that manage to convey a full sense of who they are while driving the various plots of their twisted love lives forward. They are a motley assortment who display a wide gamut of positive and negative traits associated with their age group: jealousy, lust, selfishness and arrogance alongside loyalty, forgiveness, and friendship.

“Be My Baby” is a great example of a film that is driven entirely by the characters and their decisions. The themes and behaviours of the protagonists are relatable although it may be hard to admit in the case of the more reprehensible behaviours they display. They are often unlikeable, holding a mirror up to the worst aspects of human behaviour, such as bullying, arrogance, cheating and disrespecting their partners. The film examines the difficulties of human relationships, looking at the various power dynamics between men and women and how people can be their own worst enemy. By isolating different couples from any outside world we get a unique look at how they act in each particular role, either friend, family or lover, giving the audience a deep understanding of them as a sexual or romantic being. By setting everything in these intimate spaces, we are given a look into their private lives, and see them at their most vulnerable and most exposed. Partners are often the people who we show our best and worst to and that is brought to the fore in this film. Very much a stage play brought to screen, with a sharp, incisive script and realistic, relatable, performances.

Fine, Totally Fine (2008) by Yosuke Fujita

A quirky drama about an unlikely group of friends. Akari Kinoshita (Yoshino Kimura) is a hopelessly accident-prone woman, who is hired by Hisanobu Komori (Yoshinori Okada) to work at a hospital. She spends her free time down by the river watching a homeless woman collect detritus with which she makes garbage-sculptures, whom Akari decorates her own house with drawings of. Komori’s friend Teruo Toyama (YoshiYoshi Arakawa) works as a civic groundskeeper, helping out at his father’s second hand bookstore part time. He is a horror fanatic with dreams of one day creating the scariest horror house in existence. Teruo’s father, Eitaro (Keizo Kanie), seems to have fallen into a semi-comatose slump, sitting behind his desk all day at the bookstore barely communicative with a glazed expression. After seeing a travel show on television he sets off to find some kind of respite from the daily monotony. Akari quits her hospital job and Komori recommends working at Teruo’s bookshop. Teruo and Komori’s fondness for Akari soon turns to feelings of love, but Akari has already met another man, Yuhara (Naoki Tanaka), who shows an interest in her drawings.

Written and directed by Yosuke Fujita, “Fine, Totally Fine” is an unconventional film, in that there are no great revelations or moments of triumph or disaster for the characters. There is an easy vibe and relaxing air to the film; things happen, characters talk, but there is little in the way of plot. The drama is enlivened by moments of comedy, mostly involving Teruo’s obsession with horror, such as his experience at a haunted apartment, or his various pranks on his friends. YoshiYoshi is a skilled comic actor, perfectly capturing the hapless everyman Teruo with his casual delivery and expressive features. Yoshino Kimura is also charming and amusing as Akari in a slapstick role, constantly bumbling in her attempts to seal a box, or wrap a lewd magazine for a customer. The story meanders from one scenario to the next with little momentum; instead each scene serves to highlight some example of the character’s peculiar faults or interests.

The characters all have hopes and dreams, searching for fame, fortune, or love, with varying results. The film’s themes are delicately expressed, often requiring some concentration from the viewer to piece together exactly what it is trying to say. Moments that in any other film would be paid off in the final act are here casually passed over without further comment, such as Teruo’s attempts to start a business, or Akari’s fascination with the homeless woman that begins the film. There are moments that suggest a depth to the film, with the “film within a film” that Teruo’s friends are making imitating life in unusual ways; ideas of the relationship between art and reality prominent in Akari’s drawings also; Yuhara’s job of fixing broken objects perhaps suggesting a parallel with the characters who are all missing pieces of themselves. Many of the characters seem to be trapped in situations that are not what they want to be doing; but it would be hard to describe them as suffering. There are certainly things to enjoy here: excellent performances, and a couple of genuinely funny moments; but the languid pace, absent plot, and vague gesturing towards a central theme may put off viewers who are looking for something more conventional.

Parks (2017) by Natsuki Seta

Jun (Ai Hashimoto) is struggling to come up with a thesis for the communications professor on her socio-cultural studies course. By a quirk of fate she bumps into Haru (Mei Nagano), who is searching for her grandfather’s former sweetheart from letters she discovered after her passing. The two girls set out to find this woman and soon meet her grandson, Tokio (Shota Sometani), who tells them that she has also recently passed. The three discover an old incomplete recording of a song that the old couple had written and recorded together and decide that they should write the rest of the song, which they later decide to perform at the upcoming music festival in the park.

The thin plot, languid pacing, and gentle, non-confrontational atmosphere of the film is much like spending a pleasant afternoon sitting in a park, watching the world go by. Much of the film is set in and around the park, the green space offering a soothing backdrop to the drama, along with the melodic score. While there are romantic undertones with the historic story, this tension is not there in the leads, which is refreshing to see. Instead they are just three young people enjoying youth and finding their way in the world. The film features a couple of sub-plots, one involving an elderly friend of Haru’s grandmother and one relating to Jun’s past as a child star, that are underused. Instead the plot is centred on the three young adults and their quest to rediscover the past and understand the relationship of Haru’s grandfather and his former girlfriend through the fragments that are left. All three leads are supremely likeable and play well off one another. Shota Sometani delivers a comic performance as the energetic, nerdy Tokio; Ai Hashimoto and Mei Nagano have good chemistry as the new friends, balancing a wistful melancholy about the passage of time and the joyful experiences of youth.

“Parks” was commissioned as a celebration of the 100 year anniversary of Inokashira Park and the film’s themes of conservation and time emphasise a feeling of respect towards the place. It perfectly captures the atmosphere of parks as multi-generational spaces, brimming over with memories and individual stories. The trees and waters of the park offer comfort in giving people a sense of perspective. The film portrays this sense of living both with and apart from the past by having Haru step into her grandfather’s story in several moments of magical realism. “Parks” is an experiential film that hits all the right notes and captures the emotive, transcendent atmosphere of these spaces. The themes of reconnecting with the past, the power of music, the passage of time and finding peace and purpose, are all beautifully articulated. A relaxing watch with great performances from the leads and a calming, contemplative atmosphere.

Romance Doll (2020) by Yuki Tanada

Art graduate Tetsuo (Issei Takahashi) turns up at a warehouse on the recommendation of a friend. He soon discovers the job he has been set-up with is designing and manufacturing sex dolls along with senior designer Kinji (Kitaro), nicknamed Kin-Kin. He sets about his task diligently, but his first creation is deemed inadequate by their boss as it is too unrealistic. Kinji comes up with a plan: they will advertise for a female breast model by pretending that they are making prostheses for medical use. When Sonoko (Yu Aoi) turns up to model, Tetsuo falls in love with her and the two are soon married. Tetsuo finds he is unable to tell her about his real profession and Sonoko has a difficult secret of her own to share with him.

Writer and director Yuki Tanada has worked on a number of romantic comedy films and her familiarity with the genre shines through in this well-balanced relationship drama. “Romance Doll” is paced perfectly and uses gentle humour to introduce the characters. It eschews crude gags but the early scenes as Tetsuo is introduced to his new job are entertaining in the casual way they treat the subject matter of love dolls and the respect Kin-Kin has for his work, seeing his role as something akin to a sculptor of great art. The relationship between Tetsuo and Sonoko is tender and relatable, both uneasy at first and likeable but not without their flaws. Issei Takahashi as Tetsuo begins as an archetypical awkward young singleton, but develops into a more rounded character through his relationship with Sonoko. Yu Aoi (who also featured in Tanada’s “One Million Yen Girl”) delivers an incredible performance, hugely charismatic and  capturing both the strength and fragility of the character. The supporting cast all do an excellent job, but the film keeps a firm focus on the two leads. The direction is great throughout, with excellent use of framing and blocking, particularly in the scenes between Tetsuo and Sonoko. The dinner table is almost transformed into an interrogation room as their relationship hits several bumps in the road. There are also carefully considered cutaways that say a lot very succinctly. One such example is the still shot of two coffee cups, still part full, resting on the table following an argument, that perfectly encapsulates a sense of things left unsaid and the comfortable fantasy of the perfect relationship being brought to a sudden halt.

In many ways a straightforward tragic-romance plot, the inclusion of Tetsuo’s peculiar line of work helps give the film a quite unique feel. Alongside themes of relationship troubles, honesty and questions of fidelity, there is also an important idea brought to the fore. That of the distinction and relationship between sex and love. The film rarely sexualises Tetsuo’s work and the dolls are only ever seen as objects, quite distinct from Sonoko who displays a warmth and tenderness. As the title suggests, the idea of a “love doll” (as they are called in the film), or more accurately a “sex doll” would be quite distinct from a “Romance Doll”, which suggests a deeper connection and one that is born of struggle and genuine understanding for another person. The film is well made and brings out incredible performances from the two leads. It’s gentle blend of humour, romantic drama, and philosophizing on the nature of love make it a hugely enjoyable watch.

Beautiful, Goodbye (2019) by Eiichi Imamura

Daisuke (Yusuke Takebayashi) is on the run after attempting to murder a man who he believed to be beating his child. While driving away in a stolen car he hits a woman who is standing in the road in the middle of the night. This woman is Natsuko (Bi Yo), who is dealing with her own issues. Natsuko is undead, recently returned to life after suffering fatal head injury, and also on the run from an unpleasant and abusive boyfriend (Kosuke Haruki) who has performed a ritual to resurrect her. Daisuke and Natsuko set off together on a curious road trip attempting to outrun their fates.

Writer and director Eiichi Imamura delivers a unique take on the romantic road movie genre, and a reimagining of zombie movie tropes. The film keeps a close eye on the two protagonists. Yusuke Takebayashi’s portrayal of the nervous, stuttering Daisuke, immediately evokes sympathy for him. It is clear early on that he is not a hardened killer. As the film goes on he gains in confidence and we see him develop a better understanding of himself. Bi Yo’s Natsuko is the catalyst to his transformation, her easy-going attitude and humour helping him come out of his shell. She exudes charm and it is interesting to see the zombie here as a thinking, feeling being, which adds a layer of tragedy to the character. The two of them play well off one another and their relationship develops naturally without melodrama. The film has a gentle pace as the two travel together and gives the audience plenty of time to ruminate on the themes of fate, death and human relationships. Everything else seems to fade into insignificance as they drive along, with many scenes having only the two of them lost in their own conversations. The film will occasionally cut to Natsuko’s boyfriend (Koki Nakajima) as he attempts to find her, but for the most part it is Daisuke and Natsuko’s relationship that provides the impetus for the drama. The film ably manages to drift between blackly comic whimsy, in Natsuko’s reappearance as a zombie, and tragically doomed romance. The cinematography, by Kosuke Haruki, sets off this tone perfectly with golden sunsets and soft natural lighting that creates a relaxing vibe throughout. The smooth meditative score likewise heightens this sensation of a slow drift towards the inevitable as Daisuke and Natsuko continue their journey.

“Beautiful, Goodbye” is a film about the relationship between Daisuke and Natsuko and their reliance on one another. The metaphor of a lightbulb and a plug socket is used, fittingly unusual for the characters, to demonstrate their interdependence. The fact that Natsuko is a zombie from the moment they meet helps draw attention to the inevitable, that both of these characters are heading down a dead-end street. The only thing they don’t know is how long the road will be. As such both are forced into making the most of the time they do have. It is this also that adds the aforementioned element of doomed romance to their story. The audience realises that whatever happens, the relationship between a man on the run for attempted murder and a zombie, is unlikely to have a happy ending. Despite the darkness at its heart, it is a film that on final reflection comes with a great deal of hope. The chance meeting of these two characters proves to be a fortunate encounter with both coming to understand and reflect on who they are and what they have done. Though their time together may be short, it helps both to understand what it is they are living for. “Beautiful, Goodbye” gives us a fresh twist on the conventional road-trip romance, with captivating central performances and a transformative message about life and death.