Mary Smith is a young girl living with her mother and grandmother in a remote rural area. She is feeling isolated without any friends her own age, except for Peter, a young boy who delivers letters to her grandmother. One lazy afternoon, Mary follows two cats into the woods where she discovers a mysterious blue flower. She finds herself able to fly on a broomstick and is whisked away to the magical Eldor College, managed by Madame Mumblechook and Doctor Dee. Mary is told that her red hair, which she hates, marks her as a prodigy and adept magic user. At first pleased with her new status, Mary soon discovers that the school harbours a dark secret, with experiments in transforming animals and humans.

Based on the book “The Little Broomstick” by Mary Stewart, the film is directed by Hiromasa Yonebayashi from a screenplay by Yonebayashi and Riko Sakaguchi. The story is a straightforward adventure, with a small cast of main characters, but succeeds in making its characters expressive and memorable, particularly Mary, who is a likeable heroine. She is flawed, often caught in a lie and with a complex about her unruly red hair. These insecurities are balanced with traits such as resourcefulness, inquisitiveness and humour. Doctor Dee and Madame Mumblechook are well designed as fantastical, humorous caricatures. The film was produced by Studio Pontoc, with several animators from Studio Ghibli on their staff it is clear to see the influence both in story and animation. The magical nature of the world allows for creativity in the design of the college and it is interesting to see the English countryside rendered in this style, with the green rolling hills and woodlands captured perfectly. The action beats of the film are exciting and the score is thrilling.

“Mary and the Witch’s Flower” is a coming of age story about a young girl who is somewhat lost and alone, dealing with her anxieties, becoming confident and able to take on the world. When we first see Mary she is stifled by boredom, but her inquisitiveness leads her to a fantastical adventure. In the story of Madame Mumblechook and Doctor Dee we have a simple morality tale about the dangers of lusting after power. There are actually darker undertones regarding the morality of scientific enquiry, with the transmogrification of animals being used as an example of experimentation with questionable motivations. Overall, the film is a fun adventure tale for children, with an enjoyable magical world to get lost in. It does not over-complicate itself, but has a charming central character that young audiences will relate to.

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